Choosing a Home

Choosing a Home

There is little doubt that moving to a care home is a major life changing decision and therefore one that cannot be taken lightly, or acted upon without due consideration.

At Shaftesbury Care Group we recognise this - we also recognise how difficult it is not just to make the decision, but also to understand the process. We hope the brief note below will help you.

Choosing the right care home

Choosing the right care home

One of the first things that you need to establish is exactly the type of care placement you are going to need, it could be for example:

Once this has been established then you know which type of home to look for. Your local Social Service department can give you a listing of the homes in your area that are registered to provide the type of care that you are looking for. This will save you so much time and will help you to streamline the number of homes that you go to view.

Each care home in the U.K. has to meet the Health and Social Care Act outcomes as laid down in the Health and Social Care Act, 2008, and these are monitored by the government agency known as Care Quality Commission (CQC/Care Inspectorate (Scotland)). Each home is inspected at regular intervals to ensure they meet these requirements, and you can access these reports via the CQC web site (www.cqc.org.uk) or the Care Inspectorate (Scotland) website (www.scswis.com).

It is always advisable to visit the home before you make any decision. At Shaftesbury Care Group you are encouraged to make a ‘drop in visit’ in the first instance, that way you see the home as it really is - and then follow this up with a visit to speak to the home manager or administration manager regarding any questions that you may have.

At Shaftesbury Care Group we aim to make our homes as homely and welcoming as possible; and ensure that all of our services are offered to a high quality standard.

Affording the Care

Affording the Care

The government have set guidelines of the amount of savings and assets an individual has in deciding whether you will receive assistance with your fees. Again your local Social Services department will be able to inform you of this amount.

When considering the assets of an individual the government will view savings, private pensions and any property owned.

If you have below the amount set by the government in personal assets, then you may be entitled to request state assistance from Social Services. When Social Services consider this, they will review the amount of pension and any other state monies that you may have making up your income such as pension credit, attendance allowance etc. They will take this figure into consideration when deciding what the individual’s contribution to funding will be, and then, through their funding, they will make up the difference to the banded Social Services rate in your area (Social Services will be able to inform you what this amount is), any difference in the amount of the fees, and the amount of the funding will be expected to be made up by family contribution – this is known as ‘third party contribution’ or ‘third party top-up’.

There are also some agencies that may be able to help with this if you meet their criteria, for example Soldiers, Sailors and Air Forces Association for ex-service personnel, or the M.S. Society if your relative has multiple sclerosis, and again, it is worth enquiring of the Social Services team if you or your relative may qualify for this assistance.

There are many private agencies that can help you through this complex system or private financial advisors - however it is best to seek out specialist advice such as Care Aware (08705 134925) who may be able to help with private annuity schemes, or Help the Aged Care Fees Advisory Services (0500 767476). Many of these agencies do not charge for initial advice.

Moving to a Care Home?

Moving to a Care Home?

When the decision has been made to move into a Shaftesbury Care Group, this process will have been guided carefully by close working with yourselves and the home manager.

It is possible to bring small items of furniture, but we do ask that they meet the Fire Regulations and you should be aware that when the time comes for these items to be removed from the home, you will be responsible for that.

It is suggested for ease of identity that all items of clothing, spectacles, dentures are all named - it is surprising how easily these things can be mislaid in community living!

We want our residents to feel at home, and the best way of achieving that is to ‘set the room’ so that it contains their belongings and when the resident first sees the room, it already contains something that is ‘theirs’. In this respect we do ask, that just before residents move into our home, relatives come and personalise the room that they have chosen, this really helps residents to settle into home life much easier as they gain a sense of belonging much quicker.

When a resident moves into a Shaftesbury Care Group, we take on the responsibility for their care in partnership with their relatives, we may know about the care they need for their illnesses, but the relatives know the person much better than we do initially, and therefore you will be encouraged to take an active part in their care, including the planning of that care to ensure that they receive care based on that person being at the centre of the care they receive.

What happens if it goes wrong?

What happens if it goes wrong?

Each home has a complaints procedure, the more you are involved in your relatives care, the less the likelihood of things going wrong - each manager has an ‘open door policy’ which ensures you are encouraged to talk about the ‘little things’; that may worry or concern you - that way bigger things do not grow.

Being sure what is promised is delivered

Shaftesbury Care Group are all registered with the Care Quality Commission. This means that we have to comply with the requirements laid down by the Health and Social Care Act 2008. It is possible to view inspection reports relating to the home where you are able to see what the inspectorate feels about our homes Each home also has to complete monthly Quality Assurance Audits relating to aspects of the running of the homes, part of this audit system is to produce an action plan for the homes to work to - this ensures that we constantly strive to make improvements in our service - with your involvement and inclusion we can all strive to create a better life for our residents.

We look forward to your visit